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Revisiting Wake Word Accuracy and Privacy

June 11, 2019

I used to blog a lot about wake words and voice triggers. Sensory pioneered this technology for voice assistants, and we evangelized the importance of not hitting buttons to speak to a voice recognizer. Then everybody caught on and the technology went into main stream use (think Alexa, OK Google, Hey Siri, etc.), and I stopped blogging about it. But I want to reopen the conversation…partly to talk about how important a GREAT wake word is to the consumer experience, and partly to congratulate my team on a recent comparison test that shows how Sensory continues to have the most accurate embedded wake word solutions.

Competitive Test Results. The comparison test was done by Vocalize.ai. Vocalize is an independent test house for voice enabled products. For a while, Sensory would contract out to them for independent testing of our latest technology updates. We have always tested in-house but found that our in-house simulations didn’t always sync up with our customers’ experience. Working with Vocalize allowed us to move from our in-house simulations to more real-world product testing. We liked Vocalize so much that we acquired them. So, now we “contract in” to them but keep their data and testing methodology and reporting uninfluenced by Sensory.

Vocalize compared two Sensory TrulyHandsfree wake word models (1MB size and 250KB size) with two external wake words (Amazon and Kitt.ai’s Snowboy), all using “Alexa” as the trigger. The results are replicable and show that Sensory’s TrulyHandsfree remains the superior solution on the market. TrulyHandsfree was better/lower on BOTH false accepting AND false rejecting. And in many cases our technology was better by a longshot! If you would like see the full report and more details on the evaluation methods, please send an email request to either Vocalize (dev@vocalize.ai) or Sensory (sales@sensory.com).

 

It’s Not Easy. There are over 20 companies today that offer on-device wake words. Probably half of these have no experience in a commercially shipping product and they never will; there are a lot of companies that just won’t be taken seriously. The other half can talk a good talk, and in the right environment they can even give a working demo. But this technology is complex, and really easy to do badly and really hard to do great. Some demos are carefully planned with the right noise in the right environment with the right person talking. Sensory has been focused on low power embedded speech for 25 years, we have 65 of the brightest minds working on the toughest challenges in embedded AI. There’s a reason that companies like Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Samsung have turned to Sensory for our TrulyHandsfree technology. Our stuff works, and they understand how difficult it is to make this kind of technology work on-device! We are happy to provide APK’s so you can do you’re your own testing and judge for yourself! OK, enough of the sales pitch…some interesting stuff lays ahead…

It’s Really Important. Getting a wake word to work well is more important than most people realize. It’s like the front door to your house. It might be a small part of your house, but if you aren’t letting the homeowners in then that’s horrible, and if you are letting strangers in by accident that’s even worse. The name a company gives their wake word is usually the company brand name, imagine the sentiment that comes off when I say a brand name and it doesn’t work. Recently I was at a tradeshow that had a Mercedes booth. There were big signs that said “Hey Mercedes”…I walked up to the demo area and I said “Hey Mercedes” but nothing happened…the woman working there informed me that they couldn’t demo it on the show floor because it was really too noisy. I quickly pulled out my mobile phone and showed her that I could use dozens of wake words and command sets without an error in that same environment. Mercedes has spent over 100 years building up one of the best quality brand reputations in the car industry. I wonder what will happen to that reputation if their wake word doesn’t respond in noise? Even worse is when devices accidentally go off. If you have family members that listen to music above volume 7 then you already know the shock that a false alarm causes!

It’s about Privacy. Amazon, like Google and a few others seem to have pretty good wake words, but if you go into your Alexa settings you can see all of the voice data that’s been collected, and a lot of it is being collected when you weren’t intentionally talking to Alexa! You can see this performance issue in the Vocalize test report. Sensory substantially outperformed Amazon in the false reject area. This is when a person tries to speak to Alexa and she doesn’t respond. The difference is most apparent in babble noise where Sensory falsely rejected 3% and Amazon falsely rejected 10% in comparable sized models (250KB). However the False Accept difference is nothing short of AMAZING. Amazon false accepted 13 times in 24 hours of random noise. In this same time period Sensory false accepted ZERO times (on comparably sized 250KB models). How is this possible you may be wondering? Amazon “fixes” its mistakes in the cloud. Even though the device falsely accepts quite frequently, their (larger and more sophisticated) models in the cloud collect the error. Was that a Freudian slip? They correct the error…AND they COLLECT the error. In effect, they are disregarding privacy to save device cost and collect more data.

As the voice revolution continues to grow, you can bet that privacy will continue to be a hot topic. What you now understand is that wake word quality has a direct impact on both the user experience and PRIVACY! While most developers and product engineers in the CE industry are aware of wake words and the difficulty in making them work well on-device, they don’t often consider that competing wake words technologies aren’t created equally – the test results from Vocalize prove it! Sensory is more accurate AND allows more privacy!

Sensory CEO On Voice-Activated Technology’s Next Big Wave

January 11, 2019

Interview with Karen Webster, one of the best writers and interviewers in tech/fintech.

In 1994 the fastest imaginable connection to the internet was a 28.9 kbps dial-up modem and email was still mostly a new thing that many people were writing off as a fad. There was no such thing as Amazon.com for the first half the year and less than a third of American households owned computers. Given that, it’s not much of a surprise that the number of people thinking about voice-activated, artificial intelligence (AI)-enhanced wireless technology was extremely small — roughly the same as the number of people putting serious thought into flying cars.

But the team at Sensory is not quite as surprised by the rapid onset evolution of the voice-activated technology marketplace as everyone else may be — because when they were first opening their doors 25 years ago in 1994, this is exactly the world they had hoped to see developing two-and-a-half decades down the line, even if the progress has been a bit uneven.

“We still have a long way to go,” Sensory CEO Todd Mozer told Karen Webster in a recent conversation. “I am excited about how good speech recognition has gotten, but natural language comprehension still needs a lot of work. And combined the inputs of all the sensors devices have — for vision and speech together to make things really smart and functional in context — we just aren’t there yet.”

But for all there is still be to done, and advances that still need to be made, the simple fact that the AI-backboned neural net approach to developing for interactive technology has become “more powerful than we ever imagined it would be with deep learning,” is a huge accomplishment in and of itself.

And the accomplishments are rolling forward, he noted, as AI’s reach and voice control of devices is expanding — and embedding — and the nascent voice ecosystem is quickly growing into its adolescent phase.

“Today these devices do great if I need the weather or a recipe. I think in the future they will be able to do far more than that — but they will be increasingly be invisible in the context of what we are otherwise doing.”

Embedding The Intelligence

Webster and Mozer were talking on the eve of the launch of Sensory’s VoiceGenie for Bluetooth speaker — a new product for speaker makers to add voice controls and functions like wake words, without needing any special apps or a Wi-Fi connection. Said simply, Mozer explained, what Sensor is offering for Bluetooth makers is embedded voice — instead of voice via connection to the cloud.

And the expansion into embedded AI and voice control, he noted, is necessary, particularly in the era of data breach, cyber-crime and good old-fashioned user error with voice technology due to its relative newness.

“There are a lot of sensors on our products and phones that are gathering a lot of interesting information about what we are doing and who we are,” Mozer said.

Apart from being a security problem to send all of that information to the cloud, embedding in devices the ability to extract usefully and adapt on demand to a particular user is an area of great potential in improving the devices we all use multiple times daily.

This isn’t about abandoning the cloud, or even a great migration away from it, he said; there’s always going to be a cloud and clients for it. The cloud natively has more power, memory and capacity than anything that can be put into a device at this point on a cost-effective basis.

“But there is going to be this back-and-forth and things right now are swinging toward more embedded ability on devices,” he said. “There is more momentum in that direction.”

The cloud, he noted, will always be the home of things like transactions, which will have to flow through it. But things like verification and authentication, he said, might be centered in the devices’ embedded capacity, as opposed to in the cloud itself.

The Power Of Intermediaries

Scanning the headlines of late in the world of voice connection and advancing AI, it is easy to see two powerful players emerging in Amazon and Google. Amazon announced Alexa’s presence on 100 million devices, and Google immediately followed up with an announcement of its own that Google Assistant will soon be available on over a billion devices.

Their sheer size and scale gives those intermediaries a tremendous amount of power, as they are increasingly becoming the connectors for these services on the way to critical mass and ubiquity, Webster remarked.

Mozer agreed, and noted that this can look a little “scary” from the outside looking in, particularly given how deeply embedded Amazon and Google otherwise are with their respective mastery of eCommerce and online search.

Like many complex ecosystems, Mozer said that the “giants” — Amazon, Google and Apple to a lesser extent — are both partners and competitors, adding that Sensory’s greatest value to the voice ecosystem is when something that is very customized tech and requires a high level of accuracy and customer service features is needed. Sensory’s technology appears in products by Google, Alibaba, Docomo and Amazon, to name a few.

But ultimately, he noted, the marketplace is heading for more consolidation — and probably putting more power in the hands of very few selected intermediaries.

“I don’t think we are going to have 10 different branded speakers. There will be some kind of cohesion — someone or maybe two someones will kick butt and dominate, with another player struggling in third place. And then a lot of players who aren’t players but want to be. We’ve seen that in other tech, I think we will see it with voice.”

As for who those winning players will be, Google and Amazon look good today, but, Mozer noted, it’s still early in the race.

The Future of Connectedness

In the long term future, Mozer said, we may someday look back on all these individual smart devices as a strange sort of clutter from the past, when everyone was making conversation with different appliances. At some point, he ventured, we may just have sensors embedded in our heads that allow us to think about commands and have them go through — no voice interface necessary

“That sounds like science fiction, but I would argue it is not as far out there as you think. It won’t be this decade, but it might be in the next 50 years.”

But in the more immediate — and less Space Age — future, he said, the next several years will be about enhancing and refining voice technologies ability to understand and respond to human voice — and, ultimately, to anticipate the needs of human users.

There won’t be a killer app for voice that sets it on the right path, according to Mozer; it will simply be a lot of capacity unlocked over time that will make voice controls the indispensable tools Sensory has spent the last 25 years hoping they would become.

“When a device is accurate in identifying who you are, and carrying out your desires seamlessly, that will be when it finds its killer function. It is not a thing that someone is going to snap their fingers and come out with,” he said, “it is going to be an ongoing evolution.”

Biometrics’ Place in the Embedded Industry

October 25, 2018

I just returned from the four-day Money 20/20 event in Las Vegas. The show covers the overlap of Money and Technology including FinTech, Payment, Ecommerce and more. It had tens of thousands of attendees, over 3,500 companies, and 400 startups and lots of starpower including Richard Branson, Shaquille O’Neil, Akon, and yours truly speaking on a biometrics panel.

I walked the show floor to find the latest news in embedded biometrics and to better understand the choice between embedded and cloud based biometrics in the fintech/money space. I was impressed by how biometrics has moved into the mainstream conversation. Before mentioning the other companies I talked to, I’ll kick off with Sensory, my company.

Sensory’s focus on AI and biometrics has always been on the embedded side. We believe in data privacy and we think the best way to accomplish that is through keeping in the hands and control of the user. On a less promotional front there is also a strategic reason we focus on embedded, and that’s because the industry giants are really good at cloud based and unconstrained AI tasks, and they often give it away for free, so we are focused on a place where the Googles and Amazons of the world can be our customers and not just our competitors. On the last day of Money 20/20, Sensory introduced TrulySecure 4.0, a fusion of face and voice biometrics with improved accuracy, speed, and support for 3D.

BioConnect sponsored one of the excellent lunches at the show. I spoke to Rob Douglas, Founder and CEO of BioConnect who said, “We are on the quest for rightful identity and what we offer is a market leading mobile biometric authentication solution for the enterprise. We provide a building block like a piece of LEGO that you can apply into all the infrastructure of an Enterprise to upgrade from passwords and key fobs to a world where you have higher assurance when you are conducting digital or physical transactions.” BioConnect has been in business for eight years and has 1,600 customers and at Money 20/20, the Bank of Montreal announced a partnership with BioConnect and IBM.

BioConnect has a strong belief in face authentication, but also works with other biometrics including voice, eye, fingerprint, and behavioral. According to Douglas, “We believe in both cloud and client and we support the FIDO approach, but there are use cases where the transport of the biometrics through a cloud-based infrastructure can make a lot of sense.”

The FIDO Alliance had a large area with alliance members touting their wares. FIDO (fast identity online) is “the World’s Largest Ecosystem for Standards-Based, Interoperable Authentication.” I spoke to Andrew Shikiar, the CMO of the FIDO Alliance. Local authentication with biometrics is key to the FIDO approach. “Whether you are storing passwords or biometrics, a central repository will be targeted, and will be breached to be used in nefarious ways.” When I asked Shikiar about the desire to share biometrics across platforms he said, “That’s typical of the type of use case that our technical working groups are working to address, while leveraging the FIDO standards”

Conor White, President Americas at Daon described Daon as “a human authentication company that provides technologies to allow customers to create and manage digital identities of their users in a way that’s advantageous in a risk and security perspective.” At the show they announced a partnership to expand from their base in mobile into the contact center.

Daon provides support to a wide cross section of biometrics and provides embedded solutions through the FIDO standard but can support cloud based biometrics when desired. Daon is seeing more customers getting comfortable with going from on premise to cloud based implementations but in the vast majority of cases, the biometrics still resides on the device even if the service is run in the cloud. White sits on the board of the FIDO alliance and sees the FIDO standard with embedded biometrics gaining ground.

Veritran is a software company based in Buenos Aires and developing innovative and secure digital banking platforms for the Latin American markets. They process over 4 billion banking transactions each year, and they are now expanding from Banking into other Enterprise markets and geographies beyond Latin America. At Mobile World Congress in February, they announced a new platform for secure application development, and at Money 20/20 ,they demonstrated some of the apps developed on this platform.

Like other companies, Veritran offers a mix of biometric modalities and in talking with Veritran’s CEO Marcelo Gonzales, I learned a very interesting reason as to why they prefer embedded biometrics instead of processing in the cloud. The Latin American customers buy prepaid plans with limited data. To keep their costs down, they must keep their data usage down, and with the biometrics stored and processed on the device, transactions can occur with minimal data costs.

There were a lot of other companies at Mobile 20/20. As a quick summary I would say a few important things stood out. Biometrics are definitely taking off as we all understand the problems with passwords. A variety of biometric modalities are offered but there does seem to be a preference and movement toward face authentication that can run cross platform without specialized hardware. Most vendors offer a choice between having the biometric data stored and processed on the device or in the cloud, but with the FIDO Alliance behind embedded and the clear advantages for security and privacy, the embedded usage case seems to be winning out.

Sensory Demos Awesome AI Mashup at Finovate!

September 28, 2017

Finovate is one of those shows where you get up on stage and give a short intro and live demo. They are selective in who they allow to present and many applicants are rejected. Sensory demonstrated some really cutting-, perhaps bleeding-, edge stuff by combining animated talking avatars, with text-to-speech, lip movement synchronization, natural language speech recognition and face and voice biometrics. I don’t know of any company ever combining so many AI technologies into a single product or demo!

Speech recognition has a long history of failing on stage, and one of the ways Sensory has always differentiated itself, is that our demos always work! And all our AI technologies worked here too! Even with bright backlighting, our TrulySecure face recognition was so fast and accurate some missed it. With the microphones and echo’s in the large room, our TrulyNatural speech recognition was perfect! That said, we did have a user-error… before Jeff and I got on stage he put his demo phone in DND mode, which cut our audio output – but quickly recovered from that mishap.


Apple erred on facial recognition

September 15, 2017

On the same day that Apple rolled out the iPhone X on the coolest stage of the coolest corporate campus in the world, Sensory gave a demo of an interactive talking and listening avatar that uses a biometric ID to know who’s talking to it. In Trump metrics, the event I attended had a few more attendees than Apple.

Interestingly, Sensory’s face ID worked flawlessly, and Apple’s failed. Sensory used a traditional camera using convolutional neural networks with deep learning anti-spoofing models. Apple used a 3D camera.

There are many theories about what happened with FaceID at Apple. Let’s discuss what failure even means and the effects of 2D versus 3D cameras. There are basically three classes of failure: accuracy, spoofability, and user experience. It’s important to understand the differences between them.

False biometrics
Accuracy of biometrics is usually measured in equal error rates or false accepts (FA) and false rejects (FR). This is where Apple says it went from 1 in 50,000 with fingerprint recognition to 1 in 1,000,000 with FaceID. Those are FA rates, and they move inversely with FR – Apple doesn’t mention FR.

It’s easy to reach one in a million or one in a billion FAs by making it FR all of the time. For example, a rock will never respond to the wrong person… it also won’t respond to the right person! This is where Apple failed. They might have had amazing false accepts rates, but they hit two false rejects on stage!

I believe that there is too much emphasis placed on FA. The presumption is random users trying to break in, and 1 in 50,000 seems fine. The break-in issue typically relates to spoofability, which needs to be thought of in a different way – it’s not a random face, it’s a fake face of you.

Every biometric that gets introduces gets spoofed. Gummy bears, cameras, glue, and tape were all used to spoof fingerprints. Photos, masks, and videos have been used to spoof faces.

To prevent this, Sensory built anti-spoof models that weaken the probability of spoofing. 3D cameras also make it easier to reduce spoofs, and Apple moved in the right direction here. But the real solution is to layer biometrics, using additional layers when more security is needed.

Apple misfires on UX?
Finally, there’s an inverse relationship between user experience and security. Amazingly, this is where Apple got it wrong.Think about why people don’t like fingerprint sensors. It’s not because too many strangers get in; it’s because we have to do unnatural motions, multiple times, and often get rejected when our hands are wet, greasy, or dirty.

Apple set the FA so high on FaceID that it hurt the consumer experience by rejecting too much, which is what we saw on stage. But there’s more to it in the tradeoffs.

The easiest way to prevent spoofing is to get the user to do unnatural things, live and randomly. Blinking was a less intrusive version that Google and others have tried, but a photo with the eyes cut out could spoof it.

Having people turn their face, widen their nostrils, or look in varying directions might help prevent spoofing, but also hurt the user experience. The trick is to get more intrusive only when the security needs demand it. Training the device is also part if the user experience.

I Nailed It!

August 30, 2017

A few days ago I wrote a blog that talked about assistants and wake words and I said:

“We’ll start seeing products that combine multiple assistants into one product. This could create some strange and interesting bedfellows.”

Interesting that this was just announced:

http://fortune.com/2017/08/30/amazon-alexa-microsoft-cortana-siri/

Here’s another prediction for you…

All assistants will start knowing who is talking to them. They will hear your voice and look at your face and know who you are. They will bring you the things you want (e.g. play my favorite songs), and only allow you to conduct transaction you are qualified for (e.g. order more black licorice). Today there is some training required but in the near future they will just learn who is who much like a new born quickly learns the family members without any formal training.

How Hollywood gets biometrics wrong (and what it gets right)

June 26, 2017

Setting aside the question of whether rogue robots will create a dystopian future, there is one area that artificial intelligence (AI) in movies all seem to coalesce on: biometrics will take over for keys and passwords. There are over 200 movies that show the use of biometrics – here’s a list of 184 of them, and here’s a compilation of clips from several dozen movies.

Whether its fingerprint, voiceprint, iris, retina, face, or other biometrics, there always seems to be some sort of physical scanner in Hollywood depictions of biometrics in action. They have to hold their face or hand up to a device and the device often shines a laser and makes a noise. When they speak, a pass phrase like, “My voice is my password,” is typically required. In other words, the biometrics aren’t particularly fast or easy. The devices don’t just know who people are; they need to be queried and some sort of physical analysis needs to happen after the query.

That’s not how it’s going to play out. In fact, it’s not going to be one biometric that gets a person entrance. It will be a layering of biometrics. They won’t all happen right when you want to open a door. Some will follow you around, maintaining an ongoing assessment of who you are. Other biometrics will be seamlessly assessed from cameras or other sensors in your environment, and still other biometric elements can be added by pinging your phone and asking the phone’s opinion on who you are.

One thing Hollywood got right, though, is how spoof-able biometrics tend to be, whether it’s by removing body parts, taking pictures or videos, or capturing a fingerprint with glue or gummy bears. In one scene in the movie The 6th Day, Adam Gibson, played by Arnold Schwarzenegger, is prevented from entering a restricted area when a scanner rejects his thumbprint. When a security guard approaches asking if he can help, Schwarzenegger holds the guard at gunpoint and says, “Yeah, you can stick your thumb in that.” The guard complies, which gains Schwarzenegger access. Spoofing isn’t necessarily easy – biometric vendors try to make it hard – but most single biometrics are spoof-able, and the movies we watch certainly convey that.

We will see more of these biometric implementations with a mixture of face, voice, and behavioral biometrics combined with hand, eye, or other scans that are seamlessly taken and associated with a given person. This approach substantially increases the difficulty in spoofing, yet it can be done in a completely un-intrusive manner without wasting time. Of course, in a movie it would look like people gain access without doing anything special, and that may take away from some of the “cool factor” in watching biometrics work.

Staying Ahead with Advanced AI on Devices

June 8, 2017

Since the beginning, Sensory has been a pioneer in advancing AI technologies for consumer electronics. Not only did Sensory implement the first commercially successful speech recognition chip, but we also were first to bring biometrics to low cost chips, and speech recognition to Bluetooth devices. Perhaps what I am most proud of though, more than a decade ago Sensory introduced its TrulyHandsfree technology and showed the world that wakeup words could really work in real devices, getting around the false accept and false reject, and power consumption issues that had plagued the industry. No longer did speech recognition devices require button presses…and it caught on quickly!

Let me go on boasting because I think Sensory has a few more claims to fame… Do you think Apple developed the first “Hey Siri” wake word? Did Google develop the first “OK Google” wake word? What about “Hey Cortana”? I believe Sensory developed these initial wake words, some as demos and some shipped in real products (like the Motorola MotoX smartphone and certain glasses). Even third-party Alexa and Cortana products today are running Sensory technology to wake up the Alexa cloud service.

Sensory’s roots are in neural nets and machine learning. I know everyone does that today, but it was quite out of favor when Sensory used machine learning to create a neural net speech recognition system in the 1990’s and 2000’s.  Today everyone and their brother is doing deep learning (yeah that’s tongue in cheek because my brother is doing it too! (http://www.cs.colorado.edu/~mozer/index.php). And a lot of these deep learning companies are huge multi-billion-dollar business or extremely well-funded startups.

So, can Sensory stay ahead now and continuing pioneering innovation in AI now that everyone is using machine learning and doing AI? Of course, the answer is yes!

Sensory is now doing computer vision with convolutional neural nets. We are coming out with deep learning noise models to improve speech recognition performance and accuracy, and are working on small TTS systems using deep learning approaches that help them sound lifelike. And of course, we have efforts in biometrics and natural language that also use deep learning.

We are starting to combine a lot of technologies together to show that embedded systems can be quite powerful. And because we have been around longer and thought through most of these implementations years before others, we have a nice portfolio of over 3 dozen patents covering these embedded AI implementations. Hand in hand with Sensory’s improvements in AI software, companies like ARM, NVidia, Intel, Qualcomm and others are investing and improving upon neural net chips that can perform parallel processing for specialized AI functions, so the world will continue seeing better and better AI offerings on “the edge”.

Curious about the kind of on-device AI we can create when combining a bunch of our technologies together? So were we! That’s why we created this demo that showcases Sensory’s natural language speech recognition, chatbots, text-to-speech, avatar lip-sync and animation technologies. It’s our goal to integrate biometrics and computer vision into this demo in the months ahead:

Let me know what you think of that! If you are a potential customer and we sign an NDA, we would be happy to send you an APK of this demo so you can try it yourself! For more information about this exciting demo, please check out the formal announcement we made: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sensory-brings-chatbot-and-avatar-technology-to-consumer-devices-and-apps-300470592.html

What Makes the Latest Version of TrulySecure so Different?

May 17, 2017

A key measure of any biometric system is the inherent accuracy of the matching algorithm. Earlier attempts at face recognition were based on traditional computer vision (CV) techniques. The first attempts involved measuring key distances on the face and comparing those across images, from which the idea of the number of “facial features” associated with an algorithm was born. This method turned out to be very brittle however, especially as the pose angle or expression varied. The next class of algorithms involved parsing the face into a grid, and analyzing each section of the grid individually via standard CV techniques, such as frequency analysis, wavelet transforms, local binary patterns (LBP), etc. Up until recently, these constituted the state of the art in face recognition. Voice recognition has a similar history in the use of traditional signal processing techniques.

Sensory’s TrulySecure uses a deep learning approach in our face and voice recognition algorithms. Deep learning (a subset of machine learning) is a modern variant of artificial neural networks, which Sensory has been using since the very beginning in 1994, and thus we have extensive experience in this area. In just the last few years, deep learning has become the primary technology for many CV applications, and especially face recognition. There have been recent announcements in the news by Google, Facebook, and others on face recognition systems they have developed that outperform humans. This is based on analyzing a data set such as Labeled Faces in the Wild, which has images captured over a very wide ranging set of conditions, especially larger angles and distances from the face. We’ve trained our network for the authentication case, which has a more limited range of conditions, using our large data set collected via AppLock and other methods. This allows us to perform better than those algorithms would do for this application, while also keeping our size and processing power requirements under control (the Google and Facebook deep learning implementations are run on arrays of servers).

One consequence of the deep learning approach is that we don’t use a number of points on the face per se. The salient features of a face are compressed down to a set of coefficients, but they do not directly correspond to physical locations or measurements of the face. Rather these “features” are discovered by the algorithm during the training phase – the model is optimized to reduce face images to a set of coefficients that efficiently separate faces of a particular individual from faces of all others. This is a much more robust way of assessing the face than the traditional methods, and that is why we decided to utilize deep learning opposed to CV algorithms for face recognition.

Sensory has also developed a great deal of expertise in making these deep learning approaches work in limited memory or processing power environments (e.g., mobile devices). This combination creates a significant barrier for any competitor to try to switch to a deep learning paradigm. Optimizing neural networks for constrained environments has been part of Sensory’s DNA since the very beginning.

One of the most critical elements to creating a successful deep learning based algorithm such as the ones used in TrulySecure is the availability of a large and realistic data set. Sensory has been amassing data from a wide array of real world conditions and devices for the past several years, which has made it possible to train and independently test the TrulySecure system to a high statistical significance, even at extremely low FARs.

It is important to understand how Sensory’s TrulySecure fuses the face and voice biometrics when both are available. We implement two different combination strategies in our technology. In both cases, we compute a combined score that fuses face and voice information (when both are present). Convenience mode allows the use of either face or voice or the combined score to authenticate. TrulySecure mode requires both face and voice to match individually.

More specifically, Convenience mode checks for one of face, voice, or the combined score to pass the current security level setting. It assumes a willingness by the user to present both biometrics if necessary to achieve authentication, though in most cases, they will only need to present one. For example, when face alone does not succeed, the user would then try saying the passphrase. In this mode the system is extremely robust to environmental conditions, such as relying on voice instead of face when the lighting is very low. TrulySecure mode, on the other hand, requires that both face and voice meet a minimum match requirement, and that the combined score passes the current security level setting.

TrulySecure utilizes adaptive enrollment to improve FRR with virtually no change in FAR. Sensory’s Adaptive Enrollment technology can quickly enhance a user profile from the initial single enrollment and dramatically improve the detection rate, and is able to do this seamlessly during normal use. Adaptive enrollment can produce a rapid reduction in the false rejection rate. In testing, after just 2 adaptations, we have seen almost a 40% reduction in FRR. After 6 failed authentication attempts, we see more than 60% reduction. This improvement in FRR comes with virtually no change in FAR. Additionally, adaptive enrollment alleviates the false rejects associated with users wearing sunglasses, hats, or trying to authenticate in low-light, during rapid motion, challenging angles, with changing expressions and changing facial hair.

Guest post by Michael Farino

Sensory Winning Awards

October 6, 2016

It’s always nice when Sensory wins an award. 2016 has been a special year for Sensory because we won more awards than any other year in our 23 year history!!

Check it out:

Sensory Earns Multiple Coveted Awards in 2016
Pioneering embedded speech and machine vision tech company receiving industry accolades

Sensory Inc., a Silicon Valley company that pioneered the hands-free voice wakeup word approach, today, announced it has won over half a dozen awards in 2016 across its product-line, including awards for products, technologies, and people, covering deep learning, biometric authentication and voice recognition.

The awards presented to Sensory include the following:
AIconics are the world’s only independently judged awards celebrating the drive, innovation and hard work in the international artificial intelligence community. Sensory was initially a finalist along with six other companies in the category of Best Innovation in Deep Learning, and judges determined Sensory to be the overall WINNER at an awards ceremony held in September 2016. The judging panel was comprised of 12 independent professionals spanning leaders in artificial intelligence R&D, academia, investments, journalists and analysts.

CTIA Super Mobility 2016™, the largest wireless event in America, announced more than 70 finalists for its 10th annual CTIA Emerging Technology (E-Tech) Awards. Sensory was nominated in the category of Mobile Security and Privacy for its TrulySecure™ technology, along with Nokia, Samsung, SAP, and others. Sensory was presented with the First Place award for the category in a ceremony on September 2016 at the CTIA Las Vegas event.

Speech Technology magazine, the leading provider of speech technology news and analysis, had its 10th annual Speech Industry Awards to recognize the creativity and notable achievements of key influencers (Luminaries), major innovators (Star Performers), and impressive deployments (Implementation Awards). The editors of Speech Technology magazine selected 2016 award winners based on their industry contributions during the past 12 months. Sensory’s CEO, Todd Mozer, was awarded with a Luminary Award, making it his second time winning the prestigious award. Sensory as a company was awarded the Star Performer award along with IBM, Amazon and others.

Two well-known industry analyst firms issued reports highlighting Sensory’s industry contributions for its TrulyHandsfree product and customer leadership, offering awards for innovations, customer deployment, and strategic leadership.

“Sensory has an incredibly talented team of speech recognition and biometrics experts dedicated to advancing the state-of-the-art of each respective field. We are pleased that our TrulyHandsfree, TrulySecure and TrulyNatural product lines are being recognized in so many categories, across the various industries in which we do business,” said Todd Mozer, CEO of Sensory. “I am also thrilled that Sensory’s research and innovations in the deep learning space has been noticed, generating our company prestigious accolades and management recognition.”

For more information about this announcement, Sensory or its technologies, please contact sales@sensory.com; Press inquiries: press@sensory.com

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