CES 2014 – Sensory and Wearables Everywhere!

I spent last week at CES in Las Vegas. What a show!

The big keynote speech was the night before the show started and was given by Brian Krzanich, Intel’s new CEO. His talk was focused on Wearables, and he demonstrated 3 wearable devices (charger, in-ear, and platform architecture). The platform demo included a live on stage use of speech recognition with the low power wake up provided by Sensory. The demo was a smashing success! Several bloggers called it a “canned” demo assuming it couldn’t be live speech recognition if it worked so flawlessly!

I had a chance to walk through the Wearables area. Holy smoke there must have been 20 or 30 smart watches, a similar number of health bands, and even a handful of glasses vendors. In fact, seeing attendees wearing Google’s Glass was quite common place. The smart watches mostly communicate with Bluetooth, and some of the smaller, lighter devices, use Zigbee, ultra-low power Bluetooth, or Ant+ for wireless communications.

Sensory was all over CES, here’s some of the things Sensory sales people were able to catch us in:

  • LG new Flex phone – Cool curved phone
  • LG G2 phone – latest greatest phone from LG
  • Samsung Note 3 – new Note product
  • Samsung Android camera – command and control by Sensory!
  • Samsung new 12.4 tablet
  • Plantronics – miscellaneous headsets
  • Intel – great keynote from Intel CEO, and behind closed doors platform demos
  • Conexant – showing TV controlled by Sensory
  • ivee – clock that controls home appliances
  • Ubi – IoT product
  • Motorola – Awesome Touchless Control feature on several phones
  • Telenav – Scout navigation now hands-free
  • Cadence – showing our music control demo.
  • Realtek – showing deeply embedded PC
  • DSPG – great glasses (wearable) demo on low power chips
  • Wolfson –trigger to search demo on low power chips
  • Sensory voice command demo on CEVA TeakLite-4

Overall a great show for Sensory. Jeff Rogers, Sensory’s VP Sales told me, “A few people said they had searched out speech recognition products on the show floor to find the various speech vendors, and found that they all were using Sensory.”