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Way to go Moto Voice

September 5, 2014

I was very excited to hear Motorola’s announcements today about the new Moto X, MotoG, Moto Hint and Moto 360.

What particularly caught my ear was the statement that they were changing the name from Touchless Control to Moto Voice.  They made this decision because so many people thought the technology came from Google in the form of Android, and Moto wanted everyone to know it DIDN’T come from Google.

Actually…It came from Sensory.  At least we were an important part of it!!! We have been working on the cool new user defined triggers and are excited that Moto has adopted them for the flagship MotoX (Write-up).

This feature was announced in our TrulyHandsfree 3.0

The new Moto Hint headset is really cool too. It’s a bit like Intel’s Jarvis headset that was announced by Intel CEO Brian Krzanich at CES (and of course uses Sensory!).

Of course the Moto360 is AWESOME, and has some pretty cool voice control features. Yes, Sensory has done an “OK Google” trigger…we even benchmarked our trigger against Google’s…I might share the results in an upcoming blog if there is interest.

Touch-less Control Wins!

June 9, 2014

I still subscribe to the San Jose Mercury News, as they do a good job of tech business reporting. One of my favorite Mercury News writers is a true critic in the literary sense of the term, Troy Wolverton. Troy rarely raves and is typically critical, but in a smart, logical, and unemotional way.

A few days back he started writing about Microsoft’s  Cortana and said “Watch out Siri, someone wants your job.”

I was eager to read his review of Cortana this morning and in particular his comparison with Siri. He ended up giving it a 7/10, and concluding Siri was still ahead. What I thought was most interesting though was that in his final summary, he compared three products and three assistants based on the ease of calling up each of those assistants:

  • Cortana – required two touch steps to activate the personal voice assistant
  • Siri – required one touch step to activate the personal voice assistant
  • MotoX – The best, because you can just start talking with the keyword phrase “OK Google Now” making a TrulyHandsfree experience!!

Motorola is Sensory’s customer, and I am happy to read that Troy gets it and considers this front end activation an important metric in comparing personal assistants!

Hey Siri what’s really in iOS8?

June 4, 2014

It was about 4 years ago that Sensory partnered with Vlingo to create a voice assistant with a special “in car” mode that would allow the user to just say “Hey Vlingo” then ask any question. This was one of the first “TrulyHandsfree” voice experiences on a mobile phone, and it was this feature that was often cited for giving Vlingo the lead in the mobile assistant wars (and helped lead to their acquisition by Nuance).

About 2 years ago Sensory introduced a few new concepts including “trigger to search” and our “deeply embedded” ultra-low power always listening (now down to under 2mW, including audio subsystem!). Motorola took advantage of these excellent approaches from Sensory and created what I most biasedly think is the best voice experience on a mobile phone. Samsung too has taken the Sensory technology and used in a number of very innovative ways going beyond mere triggers and using the same noise robust technology for what I call “sometimes always listening”. For example when the camera is open it is always listening for “shoot” “photo” “cheese” and a few other words.

So I’m curious about what Google, Microsoft, and Apple will do to push the boundaries of voice control further. Clearly all 3 like this “sometimes always on” approach, as they don’t appear to be offering the low power options that Motorola has enabled. At Apple’s WWDC there wasn’t much talk about Siri, but what they did say seemed quite similar to what Sensory and Vlingo did together 4 years ago…enable an in car mode that can be triggered by “Hey Siri” when the phone is plugged in and charging.

I don’t think that will be all…I’m looking forward to seeing what’s really in store for Siri. They have hired a lot of smart people, and I know something good is coming that will make me go back to the iPhone, but for now it’s Moto and Samsung for me!

Mobile phones – It doesn’t have to be Cost OR Quality!

April 25, 2014

It’s not often that I rave about articles I read, but Ian Mansfield of Cellular News hit the nail on the head with this article.

Not only is it a well written and concise article but its chock full of recent data (primarily from JD Power research), and most importantly it’s data that tells a very interesting story that nicely aligns with Sensory’s strategy in mobile. So, thanks Ian, for getting me off my butt to start blogging again!

A few key points from the article:

  1. Price is becoming increasingly important in the choice of mobile phones, and simultaneously the prices of mobile phones are increasing.
  2. Although price might be the most important factor in choice, the overall customer satisfaction is driven by features.
  3. The features customers want are seamless voice control (36%); built-in sensors that can gauge temperature, lighting, noise and moods to customize settings to the environment (35%); and facial recognition and biometric security (28%).
  4. As everyone knows, Samsung and Apple have the overwhelming market share in mobile phones, but interesting to me was that they also both lead in customer satisfaction.

Now, let me dive one step deeper into the problem, and explore whether customer satisfaction can be achieved with minimal impact on cost:

Seamless voice control is here and soon every phone will have it, and it doesn’t add any hardware cost. Sensory introduced the technology with our TrulyHandsfree technology that allows users to just start talking, and our “trigger to search” technology has been nicely deployed by companies like Motorola that pioneered this “seamless voice control” in many of their recent releases. The seamless voice control really doesn’t add much cost, and with excellent engines from Google and Apple and Microsoft sitting in the clouds, it can and will be nicely implemented without effecting handset pricing.

Sensors are a different story. By their nature they will be embedded into the phones and will increase cost. Some “sensors” in the broadest sense of the term are no brainers and necessities, for example microphones and cameras are a must have, and the six-axis sensors combining GPS and accelerometers are arguably must haves as well. Magnetometers, barometers are getting increasingly common, and to differentiate further leading manufacturers are embedding things like heartbeat monitors; stereo 3D cameras are just around the corner. To address the desire for biometric security Samsung and Apple have the 2 bestselling phones in the world embedded with fingerprint sensors!

The problem is that all these sensors add cost, and in particular those finger print sensors are the most expensive and can add $5-$15 to the cost of goods. It’s kind of ironic that after spending all that money on biometric security, Apple doesn’t even allow them as a security measure for purchasing iTunes. And both Samsung and Apple have been chastised for fingerprint sensors that can be cracked with gummy bears or glue!

A much more accurate and cost effective solution can be achieved for biometrics by using the EXISTING sensors on the phones and not adding special purpose biometric sensors. In particular, the “must have sensors” like microphones, cameras, and 6-axis sensors can create a more secure environment that is just as seamless but much less difficult to crack. I’ll talk more about that in my next blog.

CES 2014 – Sensory and Wearables Everywhere!

January 15, 2014

I spent last week at CES in Las Vegas. What a show!

The big keynote speech was the night before the show started and was given by Brian Krzanich, Intel’s new CEO. His talk was focused on Wearables, and he demonstrated 3 wearable devices (charger, in-ear, and platform architecture). The platform demo included a live on stage use of speech recognition with the low power wake up provided by Sensory. The demo was a smashing success! Several bloggers called it a “canned” demo assuming it couldn’t be live speech recognition if it worked so flawlessly!

I had a chance to walk through the Wearables area. Holy smoke there must have been 20 or 30 smart watches, a similar number of health bands, and even a handful of glasses vendors. In fact, seeing attendees wearing Google’s Glass was quite common place. The smart watches mostly communicate with Bluetooth, and some of the smaller, lighter devices, use Zigbee, ultra-low power Bluetooth, or Ant+ for wireless communications.

Sensory was all over CES, here’s some of the things Sensory sales people were able to catch us in:

  • LG new Flex phone – Cool curved phone
  • LG G2 phone – latest greatest phone from LG
  • Samsung Note 3 – new Note product
  • Samsung Android camera – command and control by Sensory!
  • Samsung new 12.4 tablet
  • Plantronics – miscellaneous headsets
  • Intel – great keynote from Intel CEO, and behind closed doors platform demos
  • Conexant – showing TV controlled by Sensory
  • ivee – clock that controls home appliances
  • Ubi – IoT product
  • Motorola – Awesome Touchless Control feature on several phones
  • Telenav – Scout navigation now hands-free
  • Cadence – showing our music control demo.
  • Realtek – showing deeply embedded PC
  • DSPG – great glasses (wearable) demo on low power chips
  • Wolfson –trigger to search demo on low power chips
  • Sensory voice command demo on CEVA TeakLite-4

Overall a great show for Sensory. Jeff Rogers, Sensory’s VP Sales told me, “A few people said they had searched out speech recognition products on the show floor to find the various speech vendors, and found that they all were using Sensory.”

Have I told you how much I love those Moto X ads?

September 27, 2013

I think everybody in the speech industry must know about Motorola’s touchless control feature. Their ad campaign using comedian/actor TJ Miller has been a smashing success. Although their ads started off a bit racy (“touch each other not phones”), the switch to Miller introduced  the “lazy phone guy” (which appears to be a knock on Apple) and better  showcases key features and advantages of Moto X. The big advantage is in the low power speech activation technology that calls up Google Now without touching the phone!

The lazy phone campaign has ads for each of the device’s key features – Touchless Control, Quick Capture, Active Notifications, and the “Design It Yourself” concept. They are all entertaining, but it’s the touchless control that brings the most laughs. The first video went viral with over 15 million views, making it one of the most popular mobile phone ads ever.

The new touchless control ad is pretty funny with hundreds of thousands of views and growing!

Out Today: Moto X is “Always Listening”

August 1, 2013

One of the leakiest announcements in recent memory, Motorola’s new Moto X is expected to be officially announced today. Rather than trying to one up Apple and Samsung with the highest resolution screen and fastest processor, the Moto X competes on its ability to be customized and its intelligent use of low power sensors. With my background, it’s no surprise that I’m excited to see the “always listening” technology enabling the wake-up command “OK Google Now”. With this feature, speech recognition is enabled but in an ultra low power state, so it can be on and responsive without draining the battery. From other “press leaks”, I’m looking forward to a line of Droid phones with similar “always listening” functionality.

Motorola isn’t the only one rolling out interesting new “always listening” kinds of functions. Samsung did this first in the mobile phone, but implemented it in a “driving mode” so that it was sometimes always listening. The new Moto phones have been compared with Google’s Glass and the “OK Glass” function which some hackers have noted can be put in an “always listening” mode. Qualcomm has even implemented a speech technology on their chips and Android has released a function like this in their OS. Motorola’s use of the “always listening” trigger is especially cool because it calls up Google Now for a seamless flow from client to server speech recognition.

Here’s a demo of Sensory’s use of a very similar approach that we call “trigger to search” from a video we posted around a year ago:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEvpq7Xe-8o

So what’s Sensory’s involvement in these “always on” features from Android, Glass, Motorola, Nuance, Qualcomm, Samsung, etc.? I can’t say much except we have licensed our technology to Google/Motorola, Samsung and many others. We have not licensed Android or Qualcomm, but Qualcomm has commented on its interest in a partnership with Sensory for more involved applications.

With a mass market device like the Moto X, I’m excited to see more people experiencing the convenience of voice recognition that is always listening for your OK. Tomorrow I’m going to discuss leading voice recognition apps on the top mobile environments and then over the next few days and weeks, I’ll cover more topics around voice triggering technology such as pricing models (it’s free right?), power drain, privacy concerns with an “always listening” product, security and personalization. This is an exciting time for TrulyHandsfree™ voice control and I’d welcome your thoughts.

Following M&A Monday–It’s About the Patents

August 16, 2011

Two BIG acquisitions happened over the last week. One is big for the smartphone space, and the other is big for the speech industry. I think they both had something to do with technology patents.

Google acquired Motorola. As everyone knows, Google has been wrapped up in a lot of legal feuds over Android. Android is certainly doing well, its competitors want to knock it down, and patent infringement seems to be the preferred means of fighting. Long established companies like Microsoft, RIM and Apple have had a lot of time to build a patent portfolio…on top of that they recently outbid Google on the Nortel patent acquisition. SO… Google has to beef up its patent portfolio quickly to fight back and eventually do what big companies do – agree to cross license and stop paying the law firms! Or maybe Google just wants a boatload of patents so they can be comfortable indemnifying all the Android users.

So at the end of July, Google bought a boatload (well over 1000) of patents from IBM (Nuance bought a bunch of patents from IBM as well focused on speech tech!)

Now Google buys MOTO. Here’s something really interesting. The price paid for Nortel was about $4.5B for 6000 patents (plus patents applied for etc). That’s about $750K/patent. Google underbid and didn’t get in on the deal. Google bought MOTO Mobility for $12.5B for a little over 17,000 patents… Just under $750K/patent! VERY INTERESTING…seems like $750K/patents is the going rate for large patent portfolios!!!!!

Specialized portfolios in speech technology are worth even more!

Nuance acquires Loquendo. I’m sure this wasn’t just for patents…it was taking out one of their only competitors for both SR and TTS, and Nuance got a GREAT price for a company with a lot of excellent technology. I have no idea how many patents Loquendo has…I think 7 in the US and probably a lot more in Europe. Let’s estimate that they had 35 patents total. At $75M, that would be around $2M per patent, which isn’t far off of the per-patent price Nuance paid for SVOX, who had 60-80 patents. The revenue multipliers seem pretty consistent too…SVOX was doing around $25M in sales and was bought for around 6x sales…likewise Loquendo was doing about $12.5M in sales and was bought for ABOUT SIX TIMES SALES. What does Nuance trade at? ABOUT SIX TIMES SALES. So what does that mean? Well you could argue that if Nuance pays less or equal to its revenue multiplier (6xsales) for an acquisition, then the patents essentially come free because the acquired revenues should immediately boost Nuance’s valuation by close to the purchase price.

I wonder if that’s how Nuance thinks about it. Then they wouldn’t be paying $2M for a patent or even $750K…they’d essentially get them for free and in the process build the biggest database of speech patents in the world.

Maybe Nuance’s strategy isn’t really about taking out competitors and buying customers through M&A, but maybe they want to own the majority of patents in the speech tech space. Nuance certainly hasn’t made money in using patents for lawsuits. Dave Grannan, Vlingo’s CEO was recently quoted as saying, ”We are happy to report that with this latest ruling, Nuance’s record remains perfect in patent infringement trials, they haven’t won any.” You go, Dave!

So why would Nuance want so many speech patents if they can’t make money in court? Well I’ve blogged earlier about their use of patent infringement in acquisitions. Maybe they are looking to be bought by a Google, Apple, or Microsoft…that patent portfolio could certainly do a lot in user experience fights. But if cross licensing agreements get worked out between the companies big enough to acquire Nuance, then where does that leave Nuance?

Well…without a lot of competition for sure!

Todd
sensoryblog@sensoryinc.com

A Tale of Two Awards

August 5, 2011

I recently learned about 2 awards that Sensory has won over the past year. The contrast is in how we learned about them, and the different nature of these awards. It’s really amusing, so I thought I’d share my take.

Both awards were for our TrulyHandsfree™ Voice Control. One was for the significance of Sensory’s truly hands-free trigger in implementing speech recognition without using buttons, and the other was for Sensory’s chip-based implementation of a truly hands-free interface.

The first award came from Speech Technology Magazine. Sensory won their Star Performer award for 2011, and I didn’t even know we had been nominated. In fact, nobody ever told me that we had won; I found out really by chance (thanks, Bernie!) They only gave out four of these awards this year, and I’m honored and thrilled that Sensory won one of them. It’s really a testament to our team behind TrulyHandsfree… IT’S THE MOST AMAZING TECHNOLOGY. I sent kudos to Speech Tech for having the insight to understand the significance of this technology! Speech Technology Magazine has gotten so independent and non-self-serving in their awards process, that they didn’t even take the opportunity to call us and let us know! Now we know, so thanks again, Speech Tech!

In contrast…The second award came from a market research firm I’ll call the Cold Irishman. Why don’t I use their real name? Well I can’t or they might sue me. I received a call from their “Manager of IP and Copyrights” to congratulate me, and to let me know about their thoroughly independent and fair process that looked at the entire speech market and decided that Sensory stood out… blah blah blah…

I knew there was something funny going on by the guy’s title. Yeah you guessed it. To be able to tell people we won their award costs a certain price; you pay more the more you want to use it, and you can even pay more to go to an awards banquet. He offered me programs for as little as $10K, which went up in price to WAY more than that. One of the more expensive programs was that they’d make a video for us receiving the award with lots of praise from their esteemed analysts. So, I decided to go onto YouTube and see for myself how many hits last year’s award winners were getting…my memory said low double digits, but that didn’t seem possible (Sensory’s little home-made video’s often get thousands of hits.) Just for fun I looked just now at this year’s award winners – one of them had only 10 (yes TEN) hits. Most of them must have been employees… Pretty hefty price to stroke your own own ego and get almost nothing in return! I’ve always wondered who pays to be in Whoever’s Whatever? It’s probably the same CEO’s that pay to go to award dinners!

So…Many Thanks to Leonard Klie and Speech Technology Magazine…and Cold Irishman…thanks, but no thanks! Sensory deserves recognition for innovation in speech technologies based on our hard work, not on how much we pay to market it.

Todd
sensoryblog@sensoryinc.com